Catch Amanda Relyea-Voss on the #Piratebroadcast - russjohns

Catch Amanda Relyea-Voss on the #Piratebroadcast

Welcome to the #piratebroadcast: 

Sharing Interesting people doing interesting things.

I love sharing what others are doing to create, add value, and help in their community. 

The approach people use and how they arrived at where they are today fascinates me. 

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Connect with Amanda Relyea-Voss on LinkedIn:

linkedin.com/in/amandarelyeavoss

For more information visit her website:

likeavosssm.com

Connect with Russ Johns on LinkedIn:

linkedin.com/in/nextstepnext

For more information visit his websites:

russjohns.com/

thepiratesyndicate.com/

nextstepnext.com/

Russ Johns 0:03
Welcome to the #piratebroadcast, where we interview #interestingpeople doing #interestingthings where you can expand your connections, your community. #Kindnessiscool and #smilesarefree. Let's get this party started.

It's a beautiful day for a #piratebroadcast. If you're here, listening in checking out the broadcast, thank you so much. I really I'm just humbled and appreciate your community and everybody in the conversation. Also, if you're listening on the replay leave us comments because we come back in and we listen to this and check in the comments and love to answer your questions. Today we have, it's like a boss. It's like Amanda's here and we're going to answer questions about social media and just have a casual conversation about some of the things that are going on and what We need to focus on and how we can help you in your day to day activities in social media. Amanda, what's going on?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 1:08
Everybody? I get super excited for live interviews. Just don't mind how crazy and animated I am. Is 10 o'clock where I am right now. I'm in Hamilton, Ontario. I put on a nice shirt and put on mascara for y'all today because I've been in pajamas for three months.

Russ Johns 1:31
With social media and online activities, we have an opportunity to kind of not have to be in a certain place at a certain time. Tell us your backstory and how did you get into doing what you're doing now and and what's the travel and the journey that you took to get here?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 1:50
Okay, do you want the Coles notes or like the extended

Russ Johns 1:54
You share whatever you want to share? This is open conversation.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 1:59
Okay. So I started when I was young, I wanted to be a musician. Then I switched on. I wanted to be a photographer. Then I went to university. And it turns out that photography as a career wasn't for me. I'm definitely a hobbyist. I'm good, but I like having fun with it.

Russ Johns 2:19
Yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 2:20
I ended up going back to St. Lawrence College, which is in Kingston, Ontario, my hometown, and I took integrated marketing communications.

Russ Johns 2:27
Mm hmm.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 2:28
Then from there, I was hired at a bank. I worked there for about a year I was hired to do marketing, but they didn't really let me I not kind of taking on the position of Teller, which was what I wanted to do.

Russ Johns 2:43
It didn't really thrill you?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 2:46
No, I was a model employee, and after a year, I showed up late for three shifts in a row and I got fired. I've been having like no reprimands on my record whatsoever. I took out a contract And finally for my subconscious to get out of my comfort zone of here's a steady paycheck, we don't go and chase your dreams for that I was hired by a company in Kingston. I was responsible for doing their social media as well as directory listing sales. I don't know if that's even a thing anymore, but like listing your company on an online, Yellow Pages online,

Russ Johns 3:24
Yeah

Amanda Relyea-Voss 3:24
Then social media, so

Russ Johns 3:28
Directories are still a thing.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 3:29
Okay. Well, that company is kind of like not around anymore, so I wasn't sure if that's like not

Russ Johns 3:35
Yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 3:37
I did that for a year and a bit. I was transitioning into the Ottawa head office. When I got there, I saw this like gap in revenue, so I was responsible for their Facebook and Twitter, which was the only things back then and then newsletter.

Russ Johns 3:54
Uh huh.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 3:55
They were, look, they were going out in the community and finding community events and then The stadium for free on their event calendar and then blasting it out to like 100,000 people between all of their channels. I wanted to the CEO and I was like, Can I like make a revenue stream out of this because you're missing money here. I made all these packages like for Facebook posts for X amount plus two tweets plus a newsletter shout out and a banner and blah, blah, blah.

Anyway, I made them 100 grand in my first year. After that I had some of the partners that I created in the community. Say like, you run Joe's bakery, and Joe's bakeries, a tasting event, and I reached out and I listened to a tasting event on our event calendar. After that, he was like, ooh, she's really good at social media. She was very responsive to the comments that went on their feet about my event, she answered them, it was really quick. Some of the companies themselves reached out to me and asked if I would manage their social media on the side.

Russ Johns 4:58
Right.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 4:58
I was totally fine Because I was selling social posting, I wasn't writing a strategy

Russ Johns 5:05
Right?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 5:06
Then the CEO told me it was a conflict of interest and I'd signed a non compete, and he was like, nope, you're not allowed. Then I quit. I was like, Okay, I don't want to do this anymore. If you're not going to let me kind of do some stuff on my own. After what I've done for the business.

Russ Johns 5:23
My side hustle, it'll be my full time hustle.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 5:26
Yeah, not quite yet. At that point. I signed a few clients out of the gate earnings is seven and a half years ago now. I clearly was not charging the proper amount of money to live off of, I actually ended up selling cars at Honda was my like, full time job. Then the management of social media was on the side for a few clients and the dealership was kind of dead. I actually did some of the work while I was getting paid to do that.

Russ Johns 5:55
Yeah

Amanda Relyea-Voss 5:56
But anyway, so that's like the the short short version of it but Basically, within six months of quitting my job and going out on my own, I was hired, my income was fully from the business. My first client was an hourly client. She kind of just paid me full time hours to do work for her, but I did other work. But right now, I've got a team of four. We have a bunch of clients in Canada in the US, and it's my only income and I think we're doing pretty good.

Russ Johns 6:27
Nice, nice. The beautiful thing about that story is and being a musician I can I can relate to it's like, Okay, I have a lot of different skills and you have to really land on something that really people are willing to pay for all the time on a consistent basis. The hustle and the bustle of chasing clients is part of the challenge of being an entrepreneur and you have to dedicate some of that time from the work and you get so busy you have You go get clients and you build relationships, and then you have clients and then you have, and then things evolve and things change.

It's like a machine, you have to just continually feed the machine in a way that allows you to grow and expand. With a team now, you actually have to adopt some larger clients and bring some other people in there. You can keep everybody busy, too. It's a balancing act. You've done really well. It's just amazing to watch how social media has evolved over the last 10 years. What it's really required because it's not a matter of if you have to be on social media. It's about how you're going to show up on social media.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 7:46
Yeah, and especially with what's happening in the world right now. Businesses that never thought they're going to be online have to shift their entire frame and be selling and providing services online. As were before storefront customers walking by their stuff. That's is not really a thing anymore.

Russ Johns 8:01
Yeah, that's not really a thing. Well, and it's I don't think we're, it's not gonna be over we have to deal with it right now and we have to pivot and adopt what is going on right now. Because if it's two months, 10 months, 10 years we don't know what the ending is going to look like. We need to create opportunities right now for our business.

If you have a business is shifting online video, I'm an advocate for video and video is going to be huge or continue to grow and things like this conversations are going to take place just like this in business. I want to give a shout out to some of the people that are here right now. Still, he'll right here How you doing? We're doing well and we got Craig Burnie in Laguna Beach, California. We got cat three. Hi. Awesome. All over the world here Andrew a Canadian.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 9:06
Big on bacon, not so much the doughnuts.

Russ Johns 9:10
Well, we were talking about Gabriel, Gabriel. How you doing, man? We were talking about how awesome you are and everything that's going on. Then we got Randall and Calvin from New Orleans.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 9:23
I want to go there so bad!

Russ Johns 9:23
This Yes, yes.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 9:28
When the world opens up again I will

Russ Johns 9:28
The world opens up again. Now Randall is very cool being in social media, you'll appreciate this. He created 50 different made in the state, like made in Maine made in Arizona made in Colorado. My highlight sites in LinkedIn and then he's highlighting food prot people that create food in those in those states and then build an audiences around that.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 9:57
So it's directory for cooks. You say ish?

Russ Johns 10:02
No, it's more like highlighting the manufacturers of food. Then he's highlighting those manufacturers, those producers in this in Maidan in the state so a producer in the state of Oregon would be highlighted in the state of Oregon highlight page on LinkedIn. Then he's growing audience for that manufacturer.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 10:26
Okay, Randall, if you're still on add me on LinkedIn. I kind of want to check this out.

Russ Johns 10:30
Yeah, so like a boss. Yeah, I can.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 10:36
Yes, I started the business like a boss was like super, super trendy. Obviously, my name is one letter off. I thought it was really really cool. It's actually done well for me, because it's very memorable.

Russ Johns 10:48
Yeah

Amanda Relyea-Voss 10:48
I get a lot of compliments on it. I have had some people say like, Oh, it's very juvenile whenever but guess what I want to be on forever.

Russ Johns 10:57
Okay. It we're still here. Andrew says directory sales is a perfect way to hone your skills in sales working through many of the nose and yeses flow is the best beginning.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 11:12
That is true Andrew but I will say one thing I don't know what it is about me as a human being. I had no sales experience whatsoever. My brother was also working for the company at the same time and they brought me on a sales call. I kind of like took over the entire meeting and at the end of it the person was like handing you their credit card being like charge me charge me and I'm like, I don't know how to do that I was just supposed to be watching. I went back and like I had to call my boss like, call them and take their number because we're ready to I so my nickname was like the closer after one meeting.

I was very, very young at this point. So and I've got to admit it but like we were paid a pretty a pretty penny for commission. I'd sell like five or six listings and, the price point is rather high and then I get paid. I go to CEO Mike Alright, see you next time. Meeks was out having some fun party and whatever I run out of money, I'll come back and tell some more for you. He's like, so that was like, one whole summer was a best summer ever, like so many go to the beach every day and then like work for two days, sell a bunch of stuff and then screw off again.

Russ Johns 12:17
That's the beauty of what we do online is this idea that we have flexibility is is really it's a reality if you create it that way.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 12:29
Yeah,

Russ Johns 12:30
It's not for everyone, you know, the, the ups and the downs. It's, to me, the best analogy is being a musician. You go play a gig and you get paid and then you got you got time to practice.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 12:45
Tomorrow because you're probably hung over, get up at noon, go outside, get the pull over for rehearsal at five. Now, I know when I was a musician, that is not the way that it was. I was classical. So clarinet and piano and Greek

Russ Johns 13:02
I played guitar too right?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 13:05
Pardon?

Russ Johns 13:05
You play guitar?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 13:06
Yes, but not into the capacity of the other ones I'm very terrible at guitar I actually have like knowledge in clarinet and piano guitar like, I know the for like cowboy chords haha. I started in grade seven. Then I was in private lessons almost immediately. I'm talking I would wake up two hours of practice and then school all day and then like an hour of practice and then the lesson and then an hour practice a piano. It wasn't as like free flowing because I had milestones I had to hit Like, I did coolness competition. I had to pass all the levels I had to prepare my audition pieces for university, which actually didn't end up doing but I got to the Kingston Youth Orchestra, which several people audition to play and the best ones get and I played second chair clarinet and then bass clarinet. You know what it is?

Russ Johns 14:00
Yeah, yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 14:01
I was the Only wasn't with the lung capacity. I was also like, pretty chubby in high school. So I was like, Yeah,

Russ Johns 14:07
you got it down. You gotta get it.I played band all I started playing drums when I was 11. I played through junior high in high school and marching band and then I started playing clubs, when in bands getting paid for it when I was 16. I played professionally for years. It I mean, the some of the best years I had was when I was playing six, seven nights a week. I was skiing during the day, and then I would get down from the slopes a good change, then go play at night. It's like, this is pretty good.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 14:44
This is the Life right here.

Russ Johns 14:48
Getting paid good money, too. It was awesome. I think of social media and online activities, right? Now is kind of being this, create your own activity, create your own outcome kind of job or activity that where you can earn money. It's really, you've created a niche for yourself you got four people working for you. You got social media clients that they know they need it. They know they need to have a presence online, they know they need to grow into it. What are some of the challenges that you see clients working through that you've been able to help them Master along their journey?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 15:35
That's a great question. It really depends on the client. It's funny because I'll get email inquiries. They say like, how much do you charge? I was told by a business coach many years ago that you should be putting your prices on your website so that people know what your price point is, and they're not scared when you send them a proposal with X amount of money. Like packages on the website. Put dollar amounts beside them, right? The difference between what my company does and there's so many others out there is there's not a blanket strategy that works for everyone. There's some companies, we're like, we'll post three times on Facebook threetimes on Instagram two times on Twitter blah, blah, blah, blah,

What if the company doesn't make sense for them to be on Twitter? What if it doesn't want to think you'd be posting on Facebook five times a week? The challenge is your need depending on what the client wants to achieve you through social media, do you want to generate sales? Do you want to, establish yourself as an influencer? Do you want to drive traffic to your website into your funnel, and

Russ Johns 16:45
Each outcome has a different strategy.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 16:48
We have a very, very particular discovery session that each potential client goes through, or he asked like a 14 different questions and like through the answers to those questions, we uncover the best way to help them. Every single strategy is different. I'm not doing the same thing for any tool that our clients that we have right now, on top of it, we can also discover that maybe you're not a fit for full management, outsource to a company, maybe you need some lessons, and that's that high pivot with the business through COVID is the sales have gone down most businesses and if they're, especially if they're just transitioning into online sales,

Russ Johns 17:31
yeah,

Amanda Relyea-Voss 17:31
they don't have money to pay me because I'm not charging like $100 a month like when I was, two weeks in right. I cost money.

Russ Johns 17:40
All I need is Your money, that's all I needed.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 17:42
Yeah, I have a team of support, I have bills to pay. I have software programs for the business. I would accountant, like there's there's costs so I just charge him nothing. What I've done is instead of $1,000 a month service fee by five hours of my time,

Russ Johns 18:02
yeah,

Amanda Relyea-Voss 18:03
it'll be like a little bit larger upfront investment because my hourly is not low. Once the lessons are done, you can take all the knowledge that you learned, and then apply it to your own channels and not have to pay anyone else to do it. Now, there's a rare occasion where they go through a lesson and during the lesson, they're like holey F I don't want to do this. Let me just pay you and he likes me proposal and you do it.

Russ Johns 18:30
It's like when guys go glossy and they're like, Oh, no, what have I done? I don't realize it. Was this challenging?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 18:38
That's the ultimate like, like being completely honest. I want to put you through a social media lesson and I want you to be like, Oh, God, damn, I don't want to do this. Can you do for me and hire me? It's only it's only happened once. Because a lot of the people that I'm doing lessons with our musicians actually. Yeah, so like a boss caters to b2b and b2c. See clients, I actually opened up a second business under the life of awesome umbrella, I think almost two years ago. It's called remix.

We're dedicated solely to helping musicians with social media. So this is my passion project

Russ Johns 19:12
Okay.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 19:14
I wanted to open it At the beginning, but basically what the business coach said was, Do b2b and b2c and get your big paying clients and then use the money that they're paying you to start your second business and you don't have to charge as my previous musicians really can't afford $1,000 for social media, especially indie

Russ Johns 19:31
Then help them out and help them grow and watch them so

Amanda Relyea-Voss 19:35
Yeah, I'm like the lessons that I've gone through like a light bulb goes off. I have some star students who are just killing and I like their content is unreal, and they're literally taking every single thing that I taught them and applying it every single day.

Russ Johns 19:52
Amanda, what would you say if we could do one thing to improve social media right now. I mean Every platform has its own personality. Like LinkedIn is not Facebook and Facebook is not Instagram, Instagram is not Tick Tock. There's a lot of things that I see. I'm not going to call them mistakes because, it's like we're all experimenting with our content here.

Consecration, there's two things that I always tell people with content creation, get started and be consistent. putting out content that is it's like you try to create something that is unique to you. Uou it's kind of branded as it's unusual. It's really personality wise, I like the personality in the posts, right. What are some other things that you've noticed that people can actually achieve with their social media some some real hard tips that are really something that you notice all the time? It's like, Oh, I wish they wouldn't do that. In your mind,

Amanda Relyea-Voss 21:09
Yeah, don't cross post every the same post on every single channel and review that. I want to see a hash tag cloud on Facebook with an axe handle, it's not tagged properly to the Facebook page associated with the business you're talking about.

Russ Johns 21:27
Explain that deeper because I want to make sure that people understand it.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 21:31
Okay, so sometimes you guys like Facebook, or Instagram on my Facebook so you can connect them right? In your Instagram account. You can when the pages are connected, you can say post to Facebook. I'm writing a really great Instagram post. My hashtag clouded and it's all good. Then I press send and the exact same post Oh, yes. To my Facebook page. Like the hash tag cloud is they're the dot dot, dot spacers. They're the big or the The app tag which works on Instagram, doesn't translate to Facebook

Russ Johns 22:04
It doesn't go to Facebook

Amanda Relyea-Voss 22:06
If your looking on Facebook, someone's like at Manny Rodin, like Who are you talking about? Because I can't click through to find it.

Russ Johns 22:14
Yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 22:15
like the CTAs for Instagram are different than the CTAs for Facebook call to action.

Russ Johns 22:20
Yeah

Amanda Relyea-Voss 22:20
On Facebook, you say like, click the link below or click here and put the link in Instagram have any ability, like if you put a link in your caption, it's not going anywhere. It's dead. There's no linking and Instagram. You either get to the point in your posts and there's actually no call to action. you're sharing something or the Lincoln bio, right click the link up above or below if you're on a story or whatever.

Russ Johns 22:48
Yeah, I know a lot of people use link tree or a tool that Yeah, it's this is like one of those things that you can actually easily Spend the information in that link to some useful links some more useful, productive links.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 23:08
Yeah. I went on my Instagram this morning I was like, Okay, so I'm going to like Like I said, mute calm, like ask me embarrassing questions and make me blush. Like, I just put it in the very top. I'm like, it'll be the top. It's like Mandy's Live podcast interview, they click and they go, but underneath there's like a bunch of other content that they can see.

Russ Johns 23:26
Uh, huh. I use FYI.to for some of that, sharing information as well. So, Rodrigo, who's active on on LinkedIn, shout out to Rodrigo. On FYI not to so. Yeah, check it out. Check it out. It's awesome. I want to I want to come back in here. There's some people here that are really in the room.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 23:53
Questions! Alright!

Russ Johns 23:54
Question. We got

Both 23:56
Are you a Pirate?

Russ Johns 23:57
Yeah,

Amanda Relyea-Voss 23:59
I was gonna wear My Pirates of the Caribbean medallion thing and I thought if my mom or my boyfriend was on and saw they probably teased me after so I just put on a normal necklace but I am a huge pirate and pirate fan.

Russ Johns 24:15
Awesome. JOHN is here. Thank you. Hi. Music is the door to the soul.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 24:23
That is to our Windows is as I know the saying

Russ Johns 24:27
yes. Yeah. Craig is Bernie. The thing about the pirate community Amanda is that everybody talks with each other in the comments.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 24:39
You see my eyes start over I'm like Ooh

Russ Johns 24:41
Yeah. Louis is a musician. He's like on Spotify has lots of great tracks on there, Louis. Thank you so much for stopping stopping in. I love it made love the message and conversation to pretty awesome people. Then, finally social media provider who bases her work on a strategic plan seeking an outcome instead of blindly drawn traffic without a goal in mind, besides volume of hits and views. Strategic

Amanda Relyea-Voss 25:16
Awe yay thanks, Andrew.

Russ Johns 25:17
Andrew. Yes, have a strategy in my good morning pirates. Angie. Howard is saying question, when you work small, what is the best way to optimize focus on a single platform with frequent content interaction really well, or have a broader strategy across platforms.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 25:38
When you're small, the first one there, so you're going to want to choose the best platform for your goal. What are your key performance indicators with social media? What are you trying to achieve? Then which platform is going to help you achieve that? Howard, if you want to add me on LinkedIn and just send me like a little note about what your goals are, I can give you some recommendations and like

Russ Johns 26:00
Connect with Amanda Tell her Russ Sencha tell her Hey, you're a pirate Russ sent me. Then she'll know that Yeah, you're there. I also want to suggest Howard that if you could pick a platform where your audience is hanging out and already having conversations, it's a good strategy. Do you agree, Amanda?

Amanda Relyea-Voss 26:27
Yeah, hundred percent. So basically what I would do if, like, if I was hired reaches out to me and says, This is my business, this is my goals. I know, okay, what's his target market? And where are they? And then you write the strategy for that platform based on where they're gonna be like, that's how targeting works on Facebook. You set up your ad and then you're like, Okay, send this ad to anyone who likes Oprah's Facebook page because fans are my target market, right?

Russ Johns 26:53
Yes.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 26:53
Yeah. Basic marketing. 101.

Russ Johns 26:56
Yeah. And Debbie, Debbie will read said hi rested Amanda really enjoying this Debbie from West Palm Beach, Florida. staying safe my Debbie. A fellow pirate. Yes. Debbie's the fellow pirate. She's awesome. A slap tags thank you so much shout out to the pirate crew grants a pirate Amanda, what is the best tip for growing your Instagram following with the 2020 algorithm? Oh, that's a great question.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 27:31
Oh that's a really great question.

Russ Johns 27:33
Yeah, looks like well

Amanda Relyea-Voss 27:35
Oh my god we can talk about this for a long, long time. It really depends on what is the goal for like, are you just trying to get followers are you trying to get engagement? The best strategy for organic follower increase is actually doing outwards engagement with other accounts. if you just sit back and post post, And think people are going to come to you. That's not reality, you've got to be out there trying to find your people and showing them where you are.

Like for all of my clients, my team spends at least one hour a week literally searching the key hashtags that have to do with that clients target audience, finding their account when we get done with their content. Okay, that's a really nice dress, and you sell dresses, right? Or you're an eco conscious person and you find a corporated V in Canada, and you're like, Oh, I love that you're the full circle production model, like so.

Beating the algorithm isn't really a thing I however, I will say, tone it down with the hashtag. A year ago, they say maxed out with it with a 30. Now it's more like 15 and make sure they're really, really targeted. Don't use hashtags that have like over a million people in the category because you're just going to be drownded out there's no way anyone's going to find you with that. Keep your hashtag into a smaller are a number and a lot of outward engagement to get on people's radar.

Russ Johns 29:06
I know that this has changed over the years to what's your experience with a number of posts per day per week? Your frequency because I know that engagement always wins. That's my rule of thumb is engagement always wins on any of the platforms. The more engaged you are, the more engagement you receive and that that opens up the doors to opportunities and more conversations you can start. I literally Amanda one time I did a website project a complete website project start to finish. got paid everything over Instagram DMS.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 29:51
Fuck Yeah, I mean,

Russ Johns 29:56
I just thought I think it's like a use case. I think it's perfect. It's Like, okay, there's still a client.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 30:03
that's awesome. So okay, well, you did you ask a number of posts. That's not really what it's about. It's not about the number of posts, it's about the quality of the content. If you're putting out one really stellar content every week, and your audience knows that that piece of content is coming on Friday, and they're looking forward to it, you're probably gonna get way more engagement, so much thrown out, you know, 10 shitty pieces of content a week.

Russ Johns 30:22
Yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 30:23
Yeah. It's not like it's before. It's like, okay, like, how many of you have to have and it's all about numbers and whatever. Like, the shift is actually not about numbers. It's about quality.

Russ Johns 30:32
Yeah.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 30:34
If you listen to like keynote speeches on a no, like, how to win the war for attention, it's always like, find what makes you unique and tell your story. It's not a cookie cutter. Like if you're a realtor, don't just post pictures of your houses. That's boring. But one of the most popular Instagram realtors is her feed looks like junk, and her entire thing and she posts photos of random She finds in houses when they're supposed to be empty. Then her pictures of cats, and they're not professional. They're not like, well done and well lit and they don't look pretty, but like she's got a shit ton of followers because you have people that are like, Oh, this is really neat. I want to see what she found on the latest house.

Russ Johns 31:18
So random. It's so random.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 31:20
Yeah.

Russ Johns 31:22
It's kind of crazy. It's a crazy. I love that question. Amanda, this has been so fun. I really appreciate I could talk social media all day long, because it's just so many so many dimensions to it. Compared to what it was three years ago, five years ago, it's it's always evolving. It's always changing. It's always brand new every day. Any words of wisdom that you want to leave with #thePiratecommunity today that would allow you to make a make an impact and legacy on the show today.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 32:02
Oh, well, my business legacy is not my legacy. I actually looked at your site and you have some products for sale. My whole thing is kindness. I just want everyone to look back and be like, Oh, she was so kind. She was so nice. That's my thing. I just put kindness above all else. When it comes to social media, be authentic. Be yourself. There's no one else that is you. That's how you're going to make a difference. Don't try to be like so and so over here. Just be real. It's okay to be vulnerable. It's okay to not be perfect. If you're having a shit day. Don't say you're having a great day. You're having a shitty day. realness of your brand's show through?

Russ Johns 32:40
Yeah, yeah. Well, I truly appreciate the fact that you're here and I'm so glad that we got to connect and, and we were talking about Gabriel and Gabriel is an awesome individual that is doing much the same thing I'm doing at night. He has a show at 5pm my time, Pacific Standard Time, and it's just this one whole community, this whole idea of being able to make connections of and having conversations like this is so important to me and and I know that there's a lot of people that appreciate it. It doesn't have to be a million people it can be. It doesn't matter what the number is. It just has to make a difference in somebody's life and wow one person one.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 33:24
That's all I want is one person

Russ Johns 33:24
Yes. Thank you so much. I know that we're probably cross paths again and let's connect you with Randall because Randall is doing something unique on Instagram or LinkedIn. I think he has a live feed as well and so you could probably go talk to him and rally some people on on some food products over there so

Amanda Relyea-Voss 33:46
I love these lives are so much better than the other ones. With a with a podcast host I want to contest I gave away a one hour social media lesson. I was like, Yeah, why do you think the future podcast because I'm like, live because We're all stuck at home and we're bored and the people that are like watching I can like, Oh, hey grant Hey Angie and like they're like, Oh my god, she's talking to me. It's real. Whoa, instead of like pre recorded and like fabricated stuff.

Russ Johns 34:12
Well, I have to mention, because right now, this thing is being streamed on Facebook, YouTube, Periscope, and LinkedIn live, right? Your platforms. One of the things I have is broadcast in the morning podcast in the afternoon, because it's converted, the audio is taken, converted into a podcast. Yeah. So I Heart Radio, Spotify, apple, iTunes all the podcast platforms. There is a piece of repurposing content and it's not a

Amanda Relyea-Voss 34:50
Thats a whole other conversation.

Russ Johns 34:50
That's a whole nother conversation. However by the end of the day, I have the transcription, the podcast, the broadcast and the post up On my website, so, yeah, it's it to me, I built this system. That's the whole point of the pirate syndicate. Building a system out that I can produce shows for other people to allow them to share their gifts. That's the whole purpose of the #Piratebroadcasts.

Amanda Relyea-Voss 35:18
Warren on Facebook, the power of one.

Russ Johns 35:21
Yeah, the power of one. Yes, the power of one. Thank you, Angie. Then there you go, Warren. Hey, Amanda. I know it's time we this went really by this went by so quickly. I appreciate the fact that you're here. Stay safe and sane everyone. Know that #kindnessiscool. #smilesarefree, and you #enjoytheday. Take care.

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